The Odd Blog

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Noodling, the White Rose, Birthers and Somewhere People Talk Like in Fargo

Posted by That Other Mike on 08/03/2009

I’ve been noodling around the internet lately reading a good bit about a variety of subjects as they take my fancy, but there have been two major preoccupations for me of late: webcomics, and birthers.

As you can all see, I have a section of blogroll on the left where I list the webcomics which have particularly caught my attention. If you’ve ever dipped into them, you’ll have noticed that they’re a pretty diverse bunch: they range from the abstract, like XKCD and Circle versus Square, to the anime-influenced Questionable Content and the semi-photo realist style of Dr McNinja.

The basic thing that links all of them, though, is that they are all pretty sharp and have good ideas; the writing is usually fresh and funny, and often thought-provoking, as in the case of Subnormality, which is really the one I wanted to bring to your attention.

The White RoseThe writer, Winston Rowntree, draws well, and has a tendency to use a lot of text; complaints about it usually prompt him to add more next time. He’s got a good sense of humour, and displays a lot of appreciation for the comedy of the absurd, something which rather endears him to me; he uses it to skewer and deride the idiocies, hypocrisies and non sequiturs of our society to devastating effect.

And as any successful satirist will be on occasion, he’s also not afraid to make serious and thoughtful points on occasion, as in the cartoon called The Line. This is really what I was getting at; the comic is moving, inspiring, educational and saddening all at once, and is a powerful reminder of why it’s important to learn history and learn from history. Not only can it teach us valuable lessons, but it can also teach us about who we are and who we should be.

The other subject I’ve been on recently has been the birthers – the persistent, paranoid, delusional and increasingly-incoherent deniers of Barack Obama’s citizenship. They’re fascinating, in a creepy and stupid way, and they seem determined to remain on the outs with reality: ever setback or judge who tells them that they’re full of it results in a retrenchment and a new conspiracy theory. These people are bound and determined not to accept the validity of the Obama Presidency, whatever the facts may say. Originally, it was “Show us your birth certificate and we’ll go away”; when Obama did so, it became “That’s a fake! We’ll get you in court!” and after several instances of judges consistently ruling against them, it became, “Well, even if you were born here, you have to have two US citizen parents to be natural-born!” This is despite every Supreme Court decision in history relating to the subject havings aid the exact opposite, along with common law and statute.

Effectively, the birthers have said that they prefer their conspiracy theories and wild theorising to the reality, which is that Obama is a natural-born citizen and the legitimate President. Whatever their reasons for this may be, whether racism, fear of his potential actions as President or legacy will be, they are more happy with their delusions.

Several sites which are invaluable sources of unbiased, accurate information are the Obama Conspiracy, Yes to Democracy and What’s Your Evidence?. If anyone has any others which provide useful information, let me know!

In other news, Lottie and the Boy have been in Minnesohhhhhta <Fargo> for a week and a bit now, and they seem to be settling in well. The Boy loves all the snow, and he gets to feed the critters out back every day; Bonnie and her husband have been true friends to all three of us, and I don’t know where we’d be without them. Well, I’d still be here and they’d still be in Texas, but you get the idea…

I’ve also been looking at various music videos from film soundtracks; I was looking at the soundtrack for The Crow, when I remembered how much I like The Cure, so I thought I’d post a video of a song, although not one from the film. That’s about it for now; enjoy the song.

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14 Responses to “Noodling, the White Rose, Birthers and Somewhere People Talk Like in Fargo”

  1. Lottie said

    Sorry I’m just now getting to this, Honey. I’ve been a bit preoccupied lately, as you know.

    I’d forgotten how much I liked The Cure too. That’s a very touching song and one I think we should add to the list of Ours.

    I will always love you… 😉

  2. Mike said

    That’s alright, silliness 🙂

    We’re living proof that you don’t have to be a Goth to like The Cure 😀

    I’ll always love you too *smooch*

  3. saintpaulgrrl said

    Yes, The Boy seems to be settling in well to life in Minnesota and has gotten quite skilled at quoting lines from Fargo. He has also studied the first four chapters of How to Talk Minnesotan, and has been receiving some private tutoring from my husband. He’s catching on to the local nuances very quickly! 😉 We’re glad he and his mom are here. Our house is full of love and vitality!

  4. Mike said

    Well, he’d have to learn – everyone knows you Minnesotans are very nationalistic and proud. *snort*

    I’m glad you’re all getting along, and that we now have a new synonym for the Boy’s relentless chatter 😀

  5. loveandmore said

    I guess I’ve been labeled a “birther” because it mattters to me that Mr. Obama is legit. I have to problem with labels. I know which ones fit and can deal with it.

    I do take exception to:

    “…they prefer their conspiracy theories and wild theorising to the reality,”

    That’s assuming a lot about so many people and frankly, not a fair or correct assumption. You would have to know the thoughts and intentions of “birthers” to make that statement accurate.

    “…they are more happy with their delusions.”

    Again, the same argument applies.

  6. Mike said

    You misunderstand. We all are concerned that Obama be legitimately President… but some of us are reasonable about it. A good many birthers are pushing pseudo-law, decrying legitimate evidence and calling for armed revolution.

    That’s assuming a lot about so many people and frankly, not a fair or correct assumption. You would have to know the thoughts and intentions of “birthers” to make that statement accurate.
    [snip]
    Again, the same argument applies.

    No, not really; I don’t think I ever claimed to have read anyone’s mind. It’s an observation, based around the positions people adopt; it’s expressed in a somewhat hyperbolic manner, I’ll grant you.

  7. loveandmore said

    Hey, Mike! Having a great day, I hope!!

    If I agree with a conspiracy theory, it’s not that I “prefer” to agree regardless of knowing it’s not reality.

    However, if I have an unreasonable, unwavering, illogical reason for believing the theory, it may be a fair statement for someone to think I “prefer” conspiracies over reality.

    It doesn’t matter to me whether I’m following a conspiracy theory even though it’s unpopular. I just know who I can talk to about it and who I can’t. The last thing I want to be is annoying. 🙂

    My co-workers think I’m a nut case because I made the statement that Mr. Obama is not eligible to be president based on the constitution. They gave me that ‘You’re-wierd-and-have-lost-your-mind’ expression and I never mentioned it to them again. I find it interesting that they never bothered to ask why I believe it. I know it’s because they don’t care. They don’t care because they don’t think it matters. The major media hasn’t said anything about it, the man was sworn into office…end of story, right?

  8. Lottie said

    I find it interesting that they never bothered to ask why I believe it. I know it’s because they don’t care. They don’t care because they don’t think it matters.

    So you’re a mind-reader? Amazing!

    You’ve made quite a few unexamined assumptions here, loveandmore. Maybe they didn’t ask because they’re tired of the whole nonsense debate. Or perhaps they were speechless to learn that people are still going on about this despite the fact that it has been repeatedly debunked. Maybe they felt that it was an inappropriate topic for the workplace. I don’t know; I’m not quite the mind-reader that you are.

    In your post about Orly Taitz, you took others to task for making assumptions about the motivations of others. Yet, upon reading through your blog, and now your latest comment here, I see you consistently doing precisely that.

    In your own words, from your own blog:

    After reading this, you may not agree and argue that Orly Taitz’s agenda is not what I believe it is. The important Judge is the One who will judge us all. Please consider this the next time you assume the motivations of another person.

    And perhaps your coworkers’ motives are not what you claim to “know” they are. It’s terribly obnoxious, of you to assume that people don’t care about this simply because they don’t see it your way (or because you don’t know how they see it despite your claim of omniscience).

    Like I said on your blog, upholding the Constitution matters very much even to people who happen to disagree with you. Your arrogant insinuation that it doesn’t is utterly shameful.

  9. loveandmore said

    Lottie–Thanks for pointing out my unexamined assumptions. (I don’t mind being corrected–though I will explain).

    I didn’t “assume” my co-workers don’t care because the expressions on their faces told me so. That’s how I based my determination. In fact, some told me they didn’t care and at the time, hadn’t heard anything about the eligibility debate. (It’s “probable” they still haven’t, given the fact the media hasn’t villified the conspiracy theorist, as they normally do when it’s in their best interest).

    However, I will rephrase my statement so it’s not assuming.

    CORRECTION: It “appears”…but I could be wrong, from the rolling of their eyes, that my co-workers think I’m a nut case because I made the statement that Mr. Obama is not eligible to be president based on the constitution.

    I could have added in my original post, that I also mentioned to my co-workers that Mr. McCain’s eligibility was also in question by Leo Dinofrio, when he brought his case to be heard by the Supreme Court. (I mentioned this to my Democrat co-workers during the campaign but not after Mr. Obama became president.

    I only mentioned it to a Republican co-worker that there were more cases going before the Supreme Court, AFTER the election but she said there’s nothing to the story because it’s hasn’t been in the news).

    You assumed my co-workers are tired of hearing about “the whole mess” and you MAY be right–but I COULD be right in my ASSUMPTION that they want to hear about such things from whatever media they get their news from, or it’s a conspiracy theory and not worth their time.

    As far as being obnoxious, I don’t believe that sharing one opinion is being obnoxious and I only mentioned the “whole mess” to co-workers once.

    Have a great day!

  10. Lottie said

    You assumed my co-workers are tired of hearing about “the whole mess”

    I assumed absolutely nothing! You said that they didn’t bother asking you why you believe what you believe, but that you “know it’s because they don’t care” and that “they don’t care because they don’t think it matters.” I was simply offering other possibilities for the their not asking, and I specifically stated that I do not know.

    But thanks for showing, yet again, that you do not read or comprehend all the words.

    As far as being obnoxious, I don’t believe that sharing one opinion is being obnoxious and I only mentioned the “whole mess” to co-workers once.

    You have insinuated on numerous occasions that those of us who don’t buy into the conspiracy theories, don’t care about upholding the Constitution or protecting our freedom. That is not simply stating an opinion. It is also making huge assumptions and judgments against other people, their integrity and their motives simply because they don’t agree with you. That is obnoxious!

  11. loveandmore said

    Hello Lottie! Thanks for letting me know I’ve been obnoxious. I won’t do it (purposefully) again.

    I hope you had a great Tuesday and have an even greater tomorrow!!

  12. Lottie said

    So, what? You’re not taking responsibility for accusing me of assuming things about your coworkers? I mean, if you can’t even own up to your mistakes in these inconsequential side discussions, you pretty much lose all credibility when it comes to the more substantial issues like President Obama’s citizenship, etc.
    😉

  13. loveandmore said

    You’re right. You used the word “maybe” in your response about my co-workers’ attitudes and I admit I SHOULD have stated that you weren’t assuming anything. One thing I SHOULD have said in my reply was: “Thanks for helping me to be a better communicator in my blog”.

    Interestingly, this IS the first time I’ve been told that not admitting to a mistake means that anything else I have to say loses credibility.

    I was thinking last night before I went to bed, that the whole purpose of starting my blog was to share my thoughts and opinions about what’s going on in the world. As I stated in my blog entitled, “Purpose”, I’m writing my blog as a journal for anyone who is willing to read it.

    I enjoy reading the comments and am grateful for anyone who stops by to read it. It’s not my original goal to interject my own thoughts into what others want to share with me, in an attempt to change their mind. I thought they might be interested to know why I don’t agree with certain statements, but I understand now that it’s really not important that we agree.

  14. Lottie said

    Interestingly, this IS the first time I’ve been told that not admitting to a mistake means that anything else I have to say loses credibility.

    An isolated incident of not admitting to a mistake would be one thing. Consistently refusing to admit mistakes, even when you have been proven conclusively wrong, that is what costs you your credibility.

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