The Odd Blog

And when our cubs grow / We'll show you what war is good for

Posts Tagged ‘plot’

The Litany of Althousian Nonsense

Posted by That Other Mike on 14/05/2011

Ann Althouse, relaxing at an undisclosed location following the attempt on her life by Blogger.

Following the recent Blogger outage, in addition to showing poor research skills, non-existent ethical standards and being a terrible professor, we can now add paranoia to the vices being cultivated by the Outhouse:

You know, I’m beginning to suspect that there’s some behind-the-scenes campaign to report my blog as abusive. People who hate/fear the Althouse blog could make a loud noise to Google.

Back in 2004, 98% of Google employees gave money to Democrats.

To her credit, she did go back and add a correction to the incorrect statistic above, but it’s not much credit, is it? It’s like giving someone props for apologising for taking a dump on your carpet, and it’s just another example of the Althousian tendency to blog first and ask questions later, which is pretty shitty journalistic ethics. Not to mention that it raises questions about her ability to effectively teach; then again, the RateMyProfessor comments are pretty telling on that score.

Furthermore, as mistermix points out over at Balloon Juice, hundreds of blogs were affected by the outage, including the very lefty Atrios at Eschaton; hardly a sign of selective targeting of wingnuts like Althouse.

So, yeah. Shitty at blogging and shitty at teaching are now joined by paranoid and Cheneyesque.

ETA: See also LGM.

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Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

My fiction and me – on being a writer and reader

Posted by That Other Mike on 01/07/2008

Before I get into my shtick about fiction, I’d just like to thank everyone who has decided to take part in our readers’ and writers’ group by joining Idiosyncratica. I’m sure we’ll all find it enjoyable and useful.

The topic we chose was “My fiction and me”, which I think is a nice and gentle opener. It may get more complex later on as we get into the swing of things and grow more confident as a group; then again, it might become easier for us to handle. We’ll see, anyway.

I’d like to start by talking about what I read. Ever since I was a young child, I’ve been an avid reader. Mainly, I think, because I am by nature quite shy; I have learned to overcome it and be more outgoing, but it is an act of will rather than nature.

My reading runs a wide range, although I am very much a fan of the 20th century in terms of what I read, probably because the 20th was the first century in which reading was not a pursuit only of the wealthy who had leisure time: it saw a huge variety of different genres explode onto the scene in a very short time, from the hardboiled noir of Chandler to the elegant visionary themes of Alfred Bester to the psychological mastery of Patricia Highsmith. The sheer volume of different books about different themes and by such different people are enough to make the 20th century my favourite.

On my bookshelf, Vernon God Little sits next to The Left Hand of Darkness and The Wasp Factory:I will read almost any genre, although I do have my limits and my favourites. I am always drawn to science fiction, perhaps because it so often offers a vision of better future, and to horror and the supernatural, my affection for which I’m almost scared to analyse! I tend to stay away from romance fiction and I often find myself turned off by modern literary fiction, which too often takes pretence and obfuscation and confuses them with profundity.

I also adore certain writers beyond all measure and will remain for ever loyal to them: Margaret Atwood, Patricia Highsmith, Ursula K. Le Guin, Iain Banks (M. or not!), for example. They have created utterly believable characters in backwoods America, apocalyptic futures or utopian worlds of wonder; they tell incredibly human stories set among grand vistas in space or among the claustrophobic nightmare of the 1950s small town.

That’s who I like to read. My writing is a different story. I write with hesitation and I really dislike the actual process of writing. It doesn’t come easily to me, and I’m never sure if anything I do is actually worth reading.

It’s not that I have trouble with story or plot – they arrive whole into my brain, with beginnings and endings and every event, all sketched in faint lines. What I have to do is fill in the colour and block out the shapes, which is what I find difficult.

As far as what I write goes, it mirrors my reading habits – I feel drawn to the supernatural and technologically magical, as well as the darker side of human habits and personalities. This makes me a little wary of showing stuff to people sometimes, and also a little disturbed about it: if I can come up with the most horrific things to happen to my characters, what does that say about me as an individual? I sometimes need to be reassured that it isn’t the mark of a psychopath to write psychopaths, but Lottie and Gary both assure me that isn’t the case. I am thus reassured 😀

Anyway, those are my reading and writing habits: my fiction and me.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »